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18 April 2007 @ 11:02 am
Community Book List  
These are books that were recommended by readers of so_very_doomed. The moderators do not necessarily endorse the content or ideologies expressed in any of these books. They are categorized (General, How-to, Historical, Fiction, and Religion) and alphabetized by title within each category.

General:
America's Bubble Economy by David Wiedemer

Collapse - How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared Diamond
Gives a great overview of the mechanisms that caused societies to collapse in the past, and allows you to see the warning signs in modern society that are going unheeded. Mr. Diamond explains these mechanisms in a way that make them easy to grasp and understand.

The Creature from Jekyll Island by G. Edward Griffin
Where does money come from? Where does it go? Who makes it? The money magicians' secrets are unveiled. We get a close look at their mirrors and smoke machines, their pulleys, cogs, and wheels that create the grand illusion called money. A dry and boring subject? Just wait! You'll be hooked in five minutes. Reads like a detective story — which it really is. But it's all true. This book is about the most blatant scam of all history. It's all here: the cause of wars, boom-bust cycles, inflation, depression, prosperity. Creature from Jekyll Island will change the way you view the world, politics, and money. Your world view will definitely change. You'll never trust a politician again — or a banker.

Endgame: The Problem of Civilization by Derrick Jensen

Endgame: Resistance by Derrick Jensen

Financial Armageddon by Michael J. Panzner

Field Notes From a Catastrophe: Man, Nature and Climate Change by Elizabeth Kolbert.

The Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America's Man-Made Landscape by James Howard Kunstler
Gives a damming analysis of the "American Dream" aka Suburbia. He knows his facts and presents them well, if cynically, irreverently, and colorfully.

The Long Emergency: Surviving the End of Oil, Climate Change, and Other Converging Catastrophes of the Twenty-First Century by James Howard Kunstler
The indictment of suburbia and the car culture that the author presented in The Geography of Nowhere turns apocalyptic in this vigorous, if overwrought, jeremiad. Kunstler notes signs that global oil production has peaked and will soon dwindle, and argues in an eye-opening, although not entirely convincing, analysis that alternative energy sources cannot fill the gap, especially in transportation.

Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness; Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation of Appalachia by Erik Reece
A must read to understand the devastation that the U.S.'s reliance upon Coal as an energy source is having upon the environment. Reece follows the fate of the aptly named Lost Mountain in Perry County, KY as it suffers the fate of mountaintop removal over the course of one year. He talks to the people involved and affected by the operations of Big Coal. Highly recommended.

The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Expedition into the Forces of History by Howard Bloom

Overshoot: The Ecological Basis of Revolutionary Change by William R. Catton.

The Party's Over by Richard Heinberg
Obligatory Peak Oil doom.

Powerdown: Options and Actions for a Post-Carbon World Richard Heinberg

The Upside of Down: Catastrophe, Creativity, and the Renewal of Civilization by Thomas Homer-Dixon.
Which is a hilarious title because so far it may be the doomiest book I have ever read. I suspect his publisher didn't like the title 'We're Totally Boned'. Converging, interconnected, everything doom.

When the Rivers Run Dry: Water--The Defining Crisis of the Twenty-first Century by Fred Pearce.
About the depletion of fresh water supplies.
How to:
Crash Proof: How to Profit From the Coming Economic Collapse by Peter D. Schiff

The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery
The definitive work on back-to-the-land skills if one is so inclined.

In the Gravest Extreme: Role of the Firearm in Personal Protection by Massad F. Ayoob

The Secure Home by Joel M. Skousen
Historical:
The Black Death by Philip Ziegler - a masterpiece of historical doom.

Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change by Stephen Kinzer
A nice look at what lengths the USA will go to for what it wants.

The Worst Hard Time: the Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dustbowl by Timothy Egan
Examples of how people managed to hold on (or not).
Fiction:
Armageddon the Musical by Robert Rankin
A three book journey into a nightmarish future, where cannibals roam around looking for some helpless bystander to nibble on.

Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle.
Post asteroid impact apocalypse, and fun too.

On the Beach by Nevil Shute.
On the Beach tells the story of the aftermath of an all-out nuclear war. The setting is Australia, one of the few places in the world to escape not only the bombs, put the deadly clouds of radioactive fallout from the war. But they'll only survive for a little while, because the global wind currents are slowly pushing the deadly fallout down to Antarctica. The Aussies only have a short time before they all come down with radiation sickness and die. The whole book is an emotional rollercoaster as the dreaded day of death looms ever closer, with absolutely nothing to prevent doom. Most people are resigned to their fate, and try and stay busy with various daily rituals in an effort to keep their sanity.

Patriots: Surviving the Coming Collapse: A Novel of the Turbulent Near Future by James Wesley Rawles
Describes a full scale socioeconomic collapse. More than just an exciting read, it is packed with useful survival and preparedness tips. "Patriots" is distinctly pro-Christian, pro-preparedness, pro-gun ownership, and anti-racist. It is considered a "must read" by those are concerned with the fragility of our society, and those interested in preparedness.

World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks.
It's fiction, but the portrayal of individuals' and societies' reactions to crisis feels disturbingly real. Very impressive.
Religion:
The Battle for God by Karen Armstrong (1999) .
A history of modern fundamentalism.

The Blind Watchmaker by Richard Dawkins (1986).

Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon by Daniel Dennett (2005).

The Crisis of Islam: Holy War and Unholy Terror by Bernard Lewis (2003).

Darwin's Cathedral: Evolution, Religion, and the Nature of Society by Daniel S. Wilson (2002).

Destroying the World to Save it by Robert Jay Lifton
About Aum Shinrikyo (the Japanese cult responsible for the Tokyo underground sarin gas attack), but has a more general section at the end, on apocalypse cults in general.

The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason by Sam Harris (2004).

The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins (2006).

In Gods we Trust: The Evolutionary Landscape of Religion by Scott Atran (2002).

What Went Wrong?: The Clash Between Islam and Modernity in the Middle East by Bernard Lewis (2003).

Why I Am Not a Christian And Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects by Bertrand Russell (1967).
Not yet sorted:
Francis Fukuyama (1992), The End of History and the Last Man.
Samuel Huntington (1998), The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order.
Paul Berman (2003), Terror and Liberalism.
Thomas Friedman (2000), The Lexus and the Olive Tree.
Sun Tzu (515-513 BC), The Art of War.
Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1486), Oration on the Dignity of Man.
Thomas More (1516), Utopia.
Niccolo Machiavelli (1532), The Prince.
Ecotopia by Ernest Callenbach
Ecotopia Emerging by Ernest Callenbach
Green Days in Brunei by Bruce Sterling (local library, part of Years Best Science Fiction, 1986 and Globalhead)
Original text of this entry:
I'd like to come up with a book list for this community. Please reply with any books you think should be on the list, keeping in mind that it will have to be a relatively short list, so rather than listing all the books about Peak Oil (for example) that you are aware of, please only mention one or two really good ones.

Please indicate the area(s) of doom, title, author and a link to more about the book. If it is fiction, please indicate that.

On second thought, I might just put a link on the info page to this entry, but it still might be overwhelming for people if there is too much stuff on the list.

Thanks!
 
 
 
tnrkitect on April 18th, 2007 04:52 pm (UTC)
The following are a few I believe should be on the list:

Society Collapse: Collapse - How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared Diamond
Gives a great overview of the mechanisms that caused societies to collapse in the past, and allows you to see the warning signs in modern society that are going unheeded.Mr. Diamond explains these mechanisms in a way that make them easy to grasp and understand.

Society Collapse due to the Built Environment: The Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America's Man-Made Landscape by James Howard Kunstler
Gives a damming analysis of the "American Dream" aka Suburbia. He knows his facts and presents them well, if cynically, irreverently, and colorfully.


tnrkitect on April 18th, 2007 10:02 pm (UTC)
Also add:

Environmental Devastation:
Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation ofAppalachia by Erik Reece

A must read to understand the devastation that the U.S.'s reliance upon Coal as an energy source is having upon the environment. Reece follows the fate of the aptly named Lost Mountain in Perry County, KY as it suffers the fate of mountaintop removal over the course of one year. He talks to the people involved and affected by the operations of Big Coal. Highly recommended.

Sam: Peak Oill33tminion on April 19th, 2007 04:56 am (UTC)
I also think that Kunstler's The Long Emergency is worth a read.
magpiegirl on April 18th, 2007 05:36 pm (UTC)

What about books from a religious/creeping-theocracy doom category? Would you like suggestions from that category?
Sperm Production Unit 873peace873 on April 18th, 2007 05:37 pm (UTC)
Yes!
Shaytelecart on April 18th, 2007 08:53 pm (UTC)
In that case:

Karen Armstrong, (1999) The Battle for God. [A history of modern fundamentalism].
Scott Atran (2002), In Gods we Trust
Richard Dawkins (2006), The God Delusion.
Richard Dawkins (1986), The Blind Watchmaker.
Daniel Dennett (2005), Breaking the Spell.
Bernard Lewis (2003), What Went Wrong.
Daniel S. Wilson (2002), Darwin’s Cathedral
Sam Harris (2004), The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason.
Bertrand Russell (1927) Why I Am Not a Christian And Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects.
Bernard Lewis (2003), The Crisis of Islam: Holy War and Unholy Terror.

Also, more general socio-historic, but definitely worthwhile in the context of this community:

Francis Fukuyama (1992), The End of History and the Last Man.
Samuel Huntington (1998), The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order.
Paul Berman (2003), Terror and Liberalism.
Thomas Friedman (2000), The Lexus and the Olive Tree.


And of course, some classics:
Sun Tzu (515-513 BC), The Art of War.
Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1486), Oration on the Dignity of Man.
Thomas More (1516), Utopia.
Niccolo Machiavelli (1532), The Prince.


The Heretictheheretic on April 18th, 2007 06:01 pm (UTC)
Non Fiction:
The Secure Home by Joel M. Skousen (via LifeAfterTheOilCrash.com)

Fiction:
Patriots by James Wesley Rawles (via survivalblog.com)
Green Days in Brunei by Bruce Sterling (local library, part of Years Best Science Fiction, 1986 and Globalhead)

I briefly considered offering up my own fiction (which is online for free) but I'm not that happy with it since I've changed a lot in 15 years and I'm now a bit embarrassed by the mistakes in reasoning and the quality of my writing. So no link (or my true name either).
fried2stylesfried2styles on April 18th, 2007 06:15 pm (UTC)
How about "Ulysses" by James Joyce. It's considered by many to be the greatest work of fiction in the 20th century,but it's garbage. Just read the first 10 pages and you'll pray for DOOM!!!
generickidgenerickid on April 18th, 2007 06:40 pm (UTC)
though not technically about doom as much as to avoid doom, both Ecotopia and Ecotopia Emerging paint rosy pictures of the dreadful state of the world. They are by Ernest Callenbach I believe.
nuclearchicken on April 18th, 2007 06:47 pm (UTC)
Richard Heinberg's The Party's Over for obligatory Peak Oil doom (it seems to be one of the best, although I've still got a few to read).

The Black Death, by Philip Ziegler - a masterpiece of historical doom.

Second the suggestion of Jared Diamond's "Collapse".

I also really enjoyed Robert Jay Lifton's Destroying the World to Save it - which is mainly about Aum Shinrikyo (the Japanese cult responsible for the Tokyo underground sarin gas attack), but has a more general section at the end, on apocalypse cults in general.

The next DOOM book on my reading list is Fred Pearce's , which looks like it'll be very good.

... and for a bit of light entertainment ... read Robert Rankin's
Armageddon: The Musical!
Eric / Damianisland42 on April 18th, 2007 07:06 pm (UTC)
jezebel873jezebel873 on April 18th, 2007 08:50 pm (UTC)
Right now I'm reading:
When the Rivers Run Dry: Water - The Defining Crisis of the Twenty-First Century. Obviously water doom.

The Upside of Down: Catastrophe, Creativity, and the Renewal of Civilization. Which is a hilarious title because so far it may be the doomiest book I have ever read. I suspect his publisher didn't like the title 'We're Totally Boned'. Converging, interconnected, everything doom.

I also recommend:
Powerdown: Options and Actions for a Post-Carbon World.

Collapse by Jared Diamond, as others have said.

These aren't strictly doom, but I think they work:
Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change for a nice look at what lengths this country will go to for what it wants.
The Worst Hard Time: the Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dustbowl for examples of how people managed to hold on (or not).
The Encyclopedia of Country Living, the definitive work on back-to-the-land skills if one is so inclined.
World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War. It's fiction, but the portrayal of individuals' and societies' reactions to crisis feels disturbingly real. Very impressive.
jezebel873jezebel873 on April 18th, 2007 08:52 pm (UTC)
Mathewerinzdad on April 18th, 2007 09:01 pm (UTC)
For fun S-F doom, praised for it's scientific accuracy, Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven/Jerry Pournelle. Post asteroid impact apocalypse, and fun too.
(Anonymous) on April 19th, 2007 07:57 am (UTC)
Overshoot: The Ecological Basis of Revolutionary Change (http://www.amazon.com/Overshoot-Ecological-Basis-Revolutionary-Change/dp/0252009886) by William R. Catton.